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This page shows most of the common multiple mutations in the chinchilla community. When breeding any multiple mutation, careful consideration of each animals' qualities must be taken. If too many mutations are mixed together without bringing in the strength of a pure standard, the consequences can be disastrous. One breed I know of that bred mutation to mutation for over four generations with no consideration to quality, decreased the health and overall quality of her animals. It was so decreased, that the kits she produced would die between two and eight months of age. Quality in the chinchilla world is synonymous with health. Make sure, if you are interested in owning a multiple mutation, that there are standards in the background. Standards are necessary for any ethical breeder's breeding program!

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Pink White (Beige X White):

This is a cross between beige and white. This color shows both the dominant white gene and the dominant beige gene. They can range from pure white to a frosted beige with a white tip to the tail. This color is often mistaken for albino when in fact it is not. Since the beige gene is present, this color does exhibit the red eyes as well as pink ears and feet.

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Tan White (Beige X White X Ebony):

This is a cross between beige, ebony and white. This color shows both the dominant white gene and the dominant beige gene. Some will show the ebony gene by showing the beige color on the belly. Most tan whites can't be proven as tan whites until bred. If a chinchilla has ebony in the background, it is best to assume it is an ebony carrier. If the chin throws an ebony kit at any time, it can then be classified as having the ebony gene. Like the pink white, the tan white also has red eyes, pink ears and pink feet.

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Tan or Beige Wrap (Beige X Ebony):

This is a cross between beige and ebony. The ebony gene works in a way with other colors that it will create a "wrapped" effect of the coloring. This means that colors that would normally have a white belly now have continuous coloration from the back to the belly. When this occurs in beige, it is commonly referred to as a tan or a beige wrap. They can range from light to extra dark. Chocolates would also be classified in this group, but don't mistake a dark tan for a chocolate. A true chocolate is almost black in color (like dark chocolate) and does not show much brown in the coat. Chocolates are very rare since they are very difficult to breed for, so the chances of anyone in the general public owning a true chocolate are slim to none. More than likely if someone sold a "chocolate" it is just a dark tan which they tried to make sounds more rare and exotic by calling it a chocolate.

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TOV Beige/Brown Velvet (Beige X Black Velvet):

This is a cross between beige and black velvet. TOV stands for "Touch of Velvet". Animals that show the black velvet gene usually exhibit a mask. Some people insist that paw stripes or spats are indicators of TOV when in fact they are not. Paw tripes or spats can be found on most chinchillas. The brown velvet is usually a darker beige because of the influence of the darker black velvet gene. They start with the darkest line being the grotzen and it fades to a lighter beige on the sides with a pure white belly. Since the beige gene is present, they exhibit the pink ears, pink feet and red eyes associated with that gene.

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Beige Violet/Pearl Beige (Beige X Violet):

This is a cross between beige and violet. This animal must be homozygous for violet (meaning both parents passed down a violet gene), but only requires one beige gene. I, personally, would not breed for this color combination. While it may sound exotic and look appealing to pet owners, this is a mess genetically. The colors do not combine well. Often the violet gene gives the beige fur a "singy" look from far off. The beige gene will also give the violet gene a more brown or reddish hue which is undesirable. The beige violets are not rare or hard to produce, but you will have a hard time finding them as only those without a proper understanding of genetics would breed for this color combination.

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Beige Sapphire (Beige X Sapphire):

This is a cross between beige and sapphire. This animal must be homozygous for sapphire (meaning both parents passed down a sapphire gene), but only requires one beige gene. I, personally, would not breed for this color combination. While it may sound exotic and look appealing to pet owners, this is a mess genetically. The sapphire mutation is not strong enough on its own to help improve any color. For anyone who is truly breeding sapphire to improve the color, this would not be a combination they would strive for. The sapphire in this combination makes the beige smaller with weaker fur and poor color.

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White Ebony (White X Ebony):

This is a cross between white and ebony. This mix is not much different phenotypically than other mosaics. Some may exhibit darker black markings that truly show the ebony color, but others show normal mosaic markings. The ebony fur has a different length and texture than the mosaic fur, so often this color combination does not do well on the show table as the judges look for an even fur pattern. When this color throws neatly marked kits, they are highly desirable on the pet market. The only way to tell a white ebony from a mosaic is to either have the genetic history of the animal, if the animal's coloration extends onto the belly, or if the animal is bred to a pure standard and produces an ebony kit.

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TOV White (White X Black Velvet):

This is a cross between white and black velvet. Since the white gene is an incomplete dominant gene, it can completely mask the presence of the TOV gene. Often, it is difficult to tell if a mosaic kit has the TOV gene. The only way to tell if a mosaic kit has the TOV gene (remember it is a dominant gene so it cannot be carried) is a combination of the background of the animal (one parent must be black velvet or proven to have the TOV gene) and if the chinchilla throws a black velvet kit or obvious TOV kit. TOV whites can be vary appealing and often do well on the show table.

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White Violet (White X Violet):

This is a cross between white and violet. The violet must be in the homozygous state (meaning both parents must contribute one violet gene) and the white, being a dominant gene, needs only one copy to show through in the phenotype. While this color can be very appealing, often it is hard to produce one that not only shows clear coloring in the violet spots, but also clear coloring in the white spots. This color is not rare, but quality bred white violets are hard to find.

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White Sapphire (White X Sapphire):

This is a cross between white and sapphire. The sapphire must be in the homozygous state (meaning both parents must contribute one sapphire gene) and the white, being a dominant gene, needs only one copy to show through in the phenotype. This combination could possibly show promise in the future. As of right now, because the sapphire mutation has been weakened over the years through poor breeding (the sapphire was a "new" color and the demand for it was high, leading to low quality breeding for faster production), this combination is small and weak. Breeders looking to improve sapphires will work mostly with sapphire and pure standards, but a few are known to dabble with one or two white sapphires.

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TOV Ebony (Ebony X Black Velvet):

This is a cross between ebony and black velvet. This cross is difficult to tell phenotypically. Since the ebony is usually so dark, it is hard to tell a TOV ebony from a hetero ebony. Usually, a TOV ebony can be identified by a full mask over the face. Most hetero ebonies do show some lighter coloration on the face. This cross can make a very strong ebony variation.

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Sapphire Wrap (Sapphire X Ebony):

This is a cross between sapphire and ebony. This cross must be homozygous for sapphire (meaning each parent must contribute a sapphire gene) and only requires one parent exhibit the ebony gene. This color shows through as sapphire and the ebony gene will manipulate how dark the sapphire shows through and there will be no white belly as the ebony gene will cause the sapphire color to wrap around onto the belly. This cross is also weaker, since the sapphires in general need to be improved before work can be done with crosses.

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TOV Sapphire (Sapphire X Black Velvet):

This is a cross between sapphire and black velvet. The sapphire must be in the homozygous state (meaning both parents must contribute one sapphire gene) and the black velvet, being dominant, only needs on gene to show through in the phenotype. This color is usually a darker sapphire color with a dark mask and sometimes darker veiling down the back.

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Violet Wrap (Violet X Ebony):

This is a cross between violet and ebony. The violet must be in the homozygous state (meaning both parents must contribute a violet gene) and the ebony only need to come from one parent. The ebony gene makes the violet color darker and eliminates the white belly by causing the violet coloration to wrap to the belly. This color can be a beautiful and vibrant purple hue, but if poorly bred, they can look muddy or orange. This color needs to be carefully bred as violets tend toward looser fur which the ebony gene can increase if proper consideration is not taken into their breeding.

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TOV Violet/Ultra Violet (Violet X Black Velvet):

This is a cross between violet and black velvet. The violet gene must be in the homozygous state (meaning both parents must contribute a violet gene) and only parent needs to contribute a black velvet gene. This color to me has the best of both the violet wrap and the regular violet. It gives a stunning contract between a deep, dark violet coloration on top and a bright white belly. They exhibit the mask from the black velvet gene and also darker veiling down the back. Like any color involving a recessive gene, careful consideration needs to be taken in breeding this color.

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There are many other color combinations that I did not take the time to describe on here. Since each coat color for chinchillas occurs at a different loci of the chinchilla's genome, all of the genes can (in theory) be expressed in the coat at the same time. To attempt this would be unethical and not in the interest of breeding for health and quality so no one has done it of yet. I have seen chinchillas advertised for sale that are a genetic mess such as TOV white beige sapphires or TOV white violet wraps. This kind of breeding is not for quality but for "rare" and "unique" colors that they can sell for higher prices. The chinchilla world is definitely a buyer beware world!